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Sonny Stitt - Blows The Blues (1960/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Sonny Stitt
Title: Blows The Blues
Genre: Jazz, Bop, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Verve Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1960 (MG V-8374)/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: Acoustic Sounds
Duration: 36:49
Recorded: Los Angeles, California on December 21 & 22, 1959.

Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound from the original analog master tapes to vinyl and PCM. The DSD was sourced from the PCM. George listened to all of the different A/D converters he had before he chose which to use, and he felt the George Massenburg GML 20 bit A/D produced the best and most synergistic sound for the project.
Sonny Stitt led a number of excellent record dates in 1959, especially at the end of the year when he produced three LPs for Verve over a span of three sessions with pianist Lou Levy, bassist Leroy Vinnegar and drummer Mel Lewis. Playing alto sax throughout this album, Stitt hardly sounds like a Charlie Parker clone, something that unfortunately was a frequent claim by tin-eared critics throughout a fair portion of his career. The music includes several potent originals, especially "Hymnal Blues" and the slow, powerful "Morning After Blues."
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Bill Evans With Jeremy Stieg - What’s New (1969/2011) DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Bill Evans With Jeremy Stieg
Title: What’s New
Genre: Jazz, Post-Bop, Piano Jazz
Label: © Verve Records | Universal Music Japan
Release Date: 1969/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: ISO SHM-SACD
Duration: 00:44:49
Recorded: January 30, February 3 & 5 & March 11, 1969 at Webster Hall, New York

This CD reissue has the debut of drummer Marty Morell with Bill Evans and bassist Eddie Gomez; that particular trio would keep the same personnel for six productive years. Actually this is a quartet set with guest flutist Jeremy Steig, whose playing recalls Herbie Mann's recording (Nirvana) with Evans back in the early '60s. Both flutists were always open to the influences of pop and rock although in both of their collaborations with Bill Evans, the music is very much on the pianist's turf. With the exception of Evans' "Time Out for Chris" and the "Spartacus Love Theme," the songs performed on this date would fit securely in the Miles Davis repertoire of the late '50s. Steig is in particularly fine form on the program which includes tunes such as "Straight No Chaser," "Autumn Leaves" and "So What." --Scott Yanow
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Keith Jarrett - Death And The Flower (1975/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Keith Jarrett
Title: Death And The Flower
Genre: Jazz, Avant-Garde, Free Jazz, Post-Bop, Piano Jazz
Label: © Impulse! | Universal Music Japan
Release Date: 1975/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: ISO SHM-SACD
Duration: 00:41:59
Recorded: October 9 and 10, 1974, at Generation Sound Studios, New York City

Death and the Flower is the third album on the Impulse label by jazz pianist Keith Jarrett. Originally released in 1975, it features performances by Jarrett's 'American Quartet' which included Dewey Redman, Charlie Haden and Paul Motian with Guilherme Franco added on percussion.

This set by the Keith Jarrett Quintet (with the leader on piano, soprano and flute, tenor-saxophonist Dewey Redman, bassist Charlie Haden, drummer Paul Motian and percussionist Guilherme Franco) contains three of Jarrett's originals. The main selection, the 21-minute "Death and the Flower," develops logically from atmospheric sounds to intense group improvising and back again; it is the main reason to acquire this CD. --Scott Yanow

Keith Jarrett delighted in subverting the familiar conventions of the piano-led jazz band with his early 1970s combo work. He relied on Redman and Haden, fire tested in the school of Ornette, who didn't really need chords from the keyboard to guide their musical journeys. And sometimes Jarrett would step away from the piano himself. The instrument does not even appear until some six minutes into this track. Instead we have a delicate web of percussion underpinning wood flute, and eventually Haden's bass enters throbbing like a slow heartbeat. But Jarrett's solo, when it arrives, is worth the wait. His touch and melodic inventiveness are shown off to good effect. Tone control, always one of his strengths, is especially evident here, with Motian and Haden giving him space and dynamic room to make best use of his ethereal pianissimo. Redman imposes a more macho attitude when his tenor enters the fray, and one can hear the whole group adjusting. In fact, the give-and-take throughout this entire performance is noteworthy. Jarrett doesn't so much lead this band as immerse himself into its suchness. Yet his composition serves as the fluid structure that makes it all possible. This extended work (some 22 minutes) is essential listening for anyone who wants to come to grips with the artistry of pre-Standards Jarrett. --Ted Gioia
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Johnny Hodges - Johnny Hodges with Billy Strayhorn and the Orchestra (1961/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Johnny Hodges
Title: Johnny Hodges with Billy Strayhorn and the Orchestra
Genre: Jazz, Big Band, Swing, Mainstream, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Verve Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1962 (V6-8452)/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: Acoustic Sounds
Duration: 36:27
Recorded: Tracks 2 to 6, 8, 10 and 11 recorded in December 11, 1961; Tracks 1, 7 and 9 recorded in December 12, 1961 at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.
Mastered at Sterling Sound by George Marino.

Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound from the original master tapes to vinyl and PCM. The DSD was sourced from the PCM. George listened to all of the different A/D converters he had before he chose which to use, and he felt the George Massenburg GML 20 bit A/D produced the best and most synergistic sound for the project.
Recorded during the last decade of his long tenure with the Duke Ellington Orchestra, this album finds the great alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges' musical gifts not only intact but stronger than ever. Featuring the Ellington band - with Jimmy Jones on piano and Billy Strayhorn as bandleader and arranger - it is a fascinating program of Ellington remakes, including tome of the orchestra's most familiar numbers, all of which have been given subtle new orchestrations by Strayhorn and melodious new interpretations by Hodges.

Alto saxophonist Johnny Hodges recorded frequently for Verve in the 1950s and 1960s, although nearly all of the musicians on this CD are from the Ellington orchestra and the arrangements are by Billy Strayhorn. Hodges is never less than superb throughout this reissue, while Lawrence Brown, Harry Carney and non-Ellingtonians Howard McGhee on trumpet and pianist Jimmy Jones also deserve praise. Strayhorn's exotic chart of "Azure" and emotional scoring of "Your Love Has Faded" are especially striking. Recommended. --Ken Dryden, AllMusic
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Bill Evans - You Must Believe In Spring (1981/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Bill Evans feat. Eddie Gómez & Eliot Zigmund
Title: You Must Believe In Spring
Genre: Jazz, Post-Bop, Modal Music, Piano Jazz
Label: © Warner Bros. Records | Warner Music Japan
Release Date: 1981/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: ISO SHM-SACD
Duration: 00:58:17
Recorded: August 23-25, 1977 at Capitol Studios, Los Angeles.

You Must Believe in Spring is an album by jazz pianist Bill Evans, recorded by Evans, bassist Eddie Gómez, and drummer Eliot Zigmund in August 1977 and released after Evans' death in September 1980. It was Evans's last recording sessions done with Gomez on bass, who left after eleven years with Evans to pursue other musical projects. Evans also recorded the title song as a duet with jazz vocalist Tony Bennett on their second album of duets titled Together Again (1977).

After more than a decade as one of the pianist’s most sympathetic bassists, this was Eddie Gomez’s last recording with Evans, a trio set with drummer Eliot Zigmund recorded in 1977 and released after Evans’ death in 1980.
Evans never stopped searching for new ideas. He might be faulted for repeatedly looking for them in the same tunes, but this program is quite varied, including Johnny Mandel’s “Suicide is Painless” (the theme from M.A.S.H. ); Michel Legrand’s title track; Gary McFarland’s waltz “Gary’s Theme,” complementing Evans’ own “B Minor Waltz (For Ellaine),” composed for Evans’ wife; and “We Will Meet Again (For Harry),” Evans’ tribute to his brother.
In Evans’ hands, melodies and time signatures are often more whispered, more shadowed, than stated, as in the opening “B Minor Waltz (For Ellaine)” and the somber, reflective title track, which blossoms, after Gomez’ mid-song solo, like dogwoods on a mid-May morning. Evans boasted such a unique, unmistakable touch—emotional and beautiful and even soft, but never sweet. (Gomez is pretty amazing himself on “M.A.S.H.,” laying down the foundation rock solid yet pushing the music forward, too.)
Among this reissue’s bonus tracks, “Without a Song” is about as ebullient as you’ll ever hear this pianist, and “Freddie Freeloader,” the one track on Miles Davis’ landmark album Kind of Blue where Evans did not play, presents the rare sound of Evans on electric piano.
As a rule, Evans could pick up the program from an elementary school chorus festival and play it inventively and beautifully. This set is no exception. --Chris M. Slawecki, All About Jazz
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Johnny Hodges - Blues A Plenty (1958/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Johnny Hodges Septet featuring Ben Webster
Title: Blues A Plenty
Genre: Jazz, Big Band, Swing, Blues, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Verve Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1958 (MG VS-68358)/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: Acoustic Sounds
Duration: 42:30
Recorded: New York, USA on April 5, 1958.

Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound from the original master tapes to vinyl and PCM. The DSD was sourced from the PCM. George listened to all of the different A/D converters he had before he chose which to use, and he felt the George Massenburg GML 20 bit A/D produced the best and most synergistic sound for the project.
"I really think that the people who are willing to lay down their money for these reissues are going to get something really outstanding." — George Marino, Sterling Sound engineer, commenting on Analogue Productions' Verve 25-title reissue series.
One of the giants of the alto saxophone, Johnny Hodges was perhaps the most important soloist and sideman in Duke Ellington's orchestra from 1928 up to Hodges' death in 1970. The self-taught player made many solo forays during his long career - one of his '50s outfits included a young John Coltrane - but history remembers Hodges for his virtuosic sidemanship, particularly his sensitive rendering of ballads.
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 The Three Sounds - Bottoms UP! (1959/2009) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: The Three Sounds
Title: Bottoms UP!
Genre: Jazz, Hard Bop, Post Bop, Soul Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1959 (BLP 4014/BST 84014)/2009
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: acousticsounds.com
Duration: 39:55
Recorded: September 16, 1958 (#2, 8), September 28, 1958 (#3), February 11, 1959 (#1, 4-7) at Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ.
Mastered from the original analog master tapes by by Kevin Gray & Steve Hoffman at AcousTech.

The Three Sounds were part of the trio explosion. Begun in 1956 in Benton Harbor, Michigan as the Four Sounds and consisting of Gene Harris on piano, Andrew Simpkins on bass and Bill Dowdy on drums (the saxophonist was dropped by the time the group moved to Washington, D.C. in 1957), the Sounds eventually migrated to New York City where they were "discovered" by Lou Donaldson. After a single record for Riverside with Nat Adderley, the Three Sounds signed an exclusive contract with Alfred Lion on Blue Note Records. Over the course of five years, the Sounds released nine LPs and appeared on albums by Lou Donaldson and Stanley Turrentine.

The second record by the Three Sounds (which, like too many of their recordings, has yet to be reissued on CD in the U.S.) features the increasingly popular group in prime form. Pianist Gene Harris, bassist Andy Simpkins and drummer Bill Dowdy are in top form performing their brand of funky jazz, which left plenty of room for inventive solos along with the percolating grooves. On this set, the trio plays seven standards (including "Besame Mucho," "Love Walked In" and "I Could Write a Book"), plus the original "Jinne Lou." Well worth searching for. --Scott Yanow
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