Category: DSD File

Olga Martynova – Harpsichord Gems, Vol. 2 – The Great Transcriptions (2005) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Olga Martynova
Title: Harpsichord Gems, Vol. 2 - The Great Transcriptions
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2005
Duration: 01:02:21
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Caro Mitis
Source: https://caromitis.nativedsd.com/albums/CM0072004-harpsichord-gems-vol2-the-great-transcriptions

When we speak about music, baroque means more than the age of figured bass and stile concertato. Today, as never before, there is a growing awareness that it is also the era of transcriptions and arrangements, which are just as indicative of the face of the age as are any innovations in the sphere of musical composition. In those far off times, the public's attitude to their favorite works of art was quite different to what it is today. It would never occur to anyone then to jealously guard from interference --- as if it were sacred --- each note of a generally recognized masterpiece. If a composition was popular it should be played as often as possible, in different transcriptions and arrangements. No musician would miss the opportunity of re-arranging a work, that had caught the public's fancy, for different players: for the leading court soloists, for his friends and pupils, or even for musicians who were quite unknown to him --- professionals and wealthy amateurs (willing to spend a fair sum of money on the acquisition of sheet music for a piece they liked). And even the duties of court music director or leader of a church choir were inconceivable without the constant re-working of their own pieces --- for yet another holiday or some other ceremonial occasion.

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Olga Martynova – Harpsichord Gems, Vol. 1 – Bach, J.C. – Clavier Sonatas (2005) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Olga Martynova
Title: Harpsichord Gems, Vol. 1 - Bach, J.C. - Clavier Sonatas
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2005
Duration: 01:08:27
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Caro Mitis
Source: https://caromitis.nativedsd.com/albums/CM0052004-harpsichord-gems-vol1-jcbach-clavier-sonatas

Supposedly Johann Sebastian Bach was a strict father who used a quotation from the poet Gellert to describe his youngest offspring: 'He will go far guided by his stupidity!' Even if the story is true, the elder Bach was undoubtedly speaking in jest: his youngest son was his favourite. And he certainly did go far. Incidentally, he lost his father when he was only 15, and few people have learned wisdom by that age. His father gave Johann Christian his first music lessons and probably created the second volume of 'The Well-Tempered Clavier' for him. This means that for both father and son their art began with the keyboards (when still a child Johann Christian could play the clavichord, harpsichord and organ; later he also grew fond of what was then a new, expensive and rare instrument -- the pianoforte). Johann Christian's early pieces were also for clavier: the young composer wrote minuets and polonaises for his mother Anna Magdalena's music notebook, the 'Clavier- Bu?chlein'. He was probably excited to inherit three harpsichords after his father's death. Perhaps his childhood memories were so strong that no matter what later took his fancy and whatever genres he preferred, Johann Christian continued to write for the clavier for the rest of his life. Some of his works for pianoforte were so popular that in musical instrum instrument shops there was increased demand for this costly novelty.

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Thierry Fischer, Utah Symphony Orchestra – Mahler: Symphony No.1 “Titan” (2015) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Thierry Fischer, Utah Symphony Orchestra
Title: Mahler: Symphony No.1 "Titan"
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2015
Duration: 52:55
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Reference Recordings
Source: https://referencerecordings.nativedsd.com/albums/FR715SACD-mahler-symphony-no-1-titan

The work recorded here is, of course, known everywhere as Mahler's First Symphony. That is not, however, what Mahler thought he was writing at the time, and it took him several years to decide quite what he had wrought (and, in the process, to drop one of the movements). Was this a symphony, or did it belong rather to that alternative, more modern category, the symphonic poem? It was as an example of this latter type that the work was performed for the first time, on November 20, 1889, in Budapest, where Mahler had a post as opera conductor---though it was at the city's main concert hall, the Vigad, that he conducted his "Symphonic Poem." At the next performance, in Hamburg four years later, the composition was billed as "Titan, a tone poem in symphony form," becoming "Titan, symphony" the following year in Weimar, then finally and fully, reduced from five movements to the standard four, "Symphony in D major" in Berlin in 1896. By that time, Mahler had completed his Second Symphony and most of his Third; he knew what he was about.

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Quirine Viersen, Combattimento Consort Amsterdam, Jan Willem de Vriend – Franz Joseph Haydn: Cello Concertos & Symphony (2006) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Quirine Viersen, Combattimento Consort Amsterdam, Jan Willem de Vriend
Title: Franz Joseph Haydn: Cello Concertos & Symphony
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2006
Duration: 01:15:33
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Etcetera Records
Source: https://etcetera.nativedsd.com/albums/cello-concertos-and-symphony

John Keats once wrote that Haydn is like a child: you never know what he is going to do next. Haydn kept his playful character combined with an increasing depth in his music throughout his life and it makes him irresistible. Take the first movement of his Cello Concerto in C major: in the development section he plays a delightful game with the melodic theme and the thrumming rhythmic motive; the composer's own enjoyment is palpable. Unexpected endings in the adagio and a finale which bursts with the joy of life and virtuoso acrobatics. The more lyrical Cello Concerto in D major also has passages that never cease to surprise: the lyrical entrance of the soloist is abruptly terminated with a sort of drum-roll. Such moments as these are splendid, for they leaven the musical brew and seem to bear Haydn's personal stamp and signature. This second concerto has greater depth than the earlier concerto in C major, especially in the Adagio, giving clear proof of the composer's later maturity. The music of Haydn's Symphony no. 60 (six movements) was originally composed for the play entitled The Absent-minded Man, 'Per la Commedia intitolata il Distratto'. It was with most likely only a few minor adaptations that Haydn transformed his distracted character into a figure for the symphonic stage. It is an enchanting work that has much more to offer the listener whenever the listener has a good conception of the play's concert. Dutch cellist Quirine Viersen is one of the foremost musical personalities of the younger generation on the international music scene today. Her intense, powerful and virtuoso playing has thoroughly convinced her colleagues, the press and the public of her great musical talent and strength. The Combattimento Consort Amsterdam (founded by Jan Willem de Vriend in 1982) is a close-knit group of musicians that dares to realise the struggle between a line and its counterpoint. It is a baroque ensemble in which contradictions are employed in order to create beauty and whose contrasts lead to intense pleasure. It is an ensemble that creates a bridge between players and public with its fresh impertinence in matters musical.

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Soloists, Chorus & Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre Moscow, Alexander Vedernikov – Mikhail Glinka: Ruslan and Lyudmila (2003) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Soloists, Chorus & Orchestra of the Bolshoi Theatre Moscow, Alexander Vedernikov
Title: Mikhail Glinka: Ruslan and Lyudmila
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2003
Duration: 03:23:10
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Pentatone
Source: https://www.pentatonemusic.com/product/110

This is the Ruslan and Lyudmila we've been waiting for. The music flows. The singers are all excellent. The chorus is clear, the Bolshoi orchestra is fantastic. Performance-wise, there is little if anything that I would complain about. In multichannel, the orchestra, the chorus and soloists are in perfect balance. Virtually every detail of the orchestration is crystal clear, the different vocal timbres of the choir nicely separated, the soloists in good perspective, all the while harmony and balance between the assembled forces is maintained. The violins are bright, but always nice and warm. There is good separation between the various string voices. The brass instruments are the most spectacular: recorded with a true three-dimensional sonority. They are never two-dimensional, squeeky or congested. Percussion has just the right amount of bang and reverb. In other words, this thing sounds like a concert. I'll go even further and say that it actually sounds better than a concert. This new critical version goes back to the original Glinka scores and attempts to recreate the opera as it was meant to be heard, rather than the version which has been played in the past century. A very special Thank You to Pentatone for releasing this. I've waited a long time to hear Ruslan and Lyudmila given the proper treatment. The result is worth the wait.

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Ewald Demeyere – Tears – Harpsichord Laments of the Seventeenth Century (2012) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Ewald Demeyere
Title: Tears - Harpsichord Laments of the Seventeenth Century
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2012
Duration: 58:02
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Challenge Records
Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/tears-harpsichord-laments-from-the-17thcentury

Amongst the seventeenth-century harpsichord repertoire, the genre of pieces referring to a loss, whether or not the death of a person, takes a special place, and forms the leitmotif of this disc. These introspective pieces, actually being meditations or contemplations, achieve in a uniquely profound way an almost spiritual level. John Downland's Lachrimae Pavan, initially a lute piece which the composer reworked as a lute song to the words Flow my Tears and as a consort piece, enjoyed great popularity in the seventeenth century. In fact, it occurs in more than one hundred manuscripts or prints in a variety of arrangements. For this CD I have included two of the finest of those transcriptions, by William Byrd and by Melchior Schildt. Byrd was one of the most influential composers of his generation, in his time called a Father of Musick and Brittanicae Musicae Parens.

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Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra, Hannu Lintu – George Enescu: Symphony No. 2 & Chamber Symphony (2012) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Tampere Philharmonic Orchestra, Hannu Lintu
Title: George Enescu: Symphony No. 2 & Chamber Symphony
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2012
Duration: 01:09:21
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: 2xHD
Source:

A 24-bit recording in DXD (Digital eXtreme Defnition) There is a pedigreed narrative about the emergence of canonic composers in the eastern half of Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Like social modernisation, cultural renewal during the nineteenth century was supposedly a response to ideas and practices from the charismatic cultural capitals of Western Europe: an appropriation and then a transformation of modalities developed elsewhere. And because of this response mode, so it is argued, there was initially an element of 'forms without substance' about the process. Then, as this response slowly fused with a developing nationalist commitment, music in these regions found its 'historical moment', initially in the Czech lands, and then in Hungary, Poland and Romania. When the conditions were right, significant composers, including Bla Bartk, Karol Szymanowski and George Enescu, appeared on cue.

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Elvis Presley – 24 Karat Hits (1997/2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Elvis Presley
Title: 24 Karat Hits
Genre: Rock
Release Date: 1997
Duration: 01:01:08
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Universal Records
Source: https://store.acousticsounds.com/d/94710/Elvis_Presley-24_Karat_Hits-DSD_Single_Rate_28MHz64fs_Download

Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound from the original analog master tapes to vinyl and PCM. The DSD was sourced from the PCM. George listened to all of the different A/D converters he had before he chose which to use, and he felt the George Massenburg GML 20 bit A/D produced the best and most synergistic sound for the project.

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Elton John – Peachtree Road (2004) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Elton John
Title: Peachtree Road
Genre: Rock
Release Date: 2004
Duration: 52:05
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Universal Records
Source: https://store.acousticsounds.com/d/95377/Elton_John-Peachtree_Road-DSD_Single_Rate_28MHz64fs_Download

Elton John's 28th studio album garnered gold status by the RIAA in December 2004. The record peaked at #18 on Billboard's Top 200 and featured three singles: Weight Of The World, Porch Swing In Tupelo and They Call Her The Cat.

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Cat Stevens – Tea For The Tillerman (1970/2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Cat Stevens
Title: Tea For The Tillerman
Genre: Folk
Release Date: 1970
Duration: 36:47
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Analogue Productions
Source: https://store.acousticsounds.com/d/95250/Cat_Stevens-Tea_For_The_Tillerman-DSD_Single_Rate_28MHz64fs_Download

Mona Bone Jakon only began Cat Stevens' comeback. Seven months later, he returned with Tea for the Tillerman, an album in the same chamber-group style, employing the same musicians and producer, but with a far more confident tone. Mona Bone Jakon had been full of references to death, but Tea for the Tillerman was not about dying; it was about living in the modern world while rejecting it in favor of spiritual fulfillment. It began with a statement of purpose, "Where Do the Children Play?," in which Stevens questioned the value of technology and progress. "Wild World" found the singer being dumped by a girl, but making the novel suggestion that she should stay with him because she was incapable of handling things without him. "Sad Lisa" might have been about the same girl after she tried and failed to make her way; now, she seemed depressed to the point of psychosis. The rest of the album veered between two themes: the conflict between the young and the old, and religion as an answer to life's questions. Tea for the Tillerman was the story of a young man's search for spiritual meaning in a soulless class society he found abhorrent. He hadn't yet reached his destination, but he was confident he was going in the right direction, traveling at his own, unhurried pace. The album's rejection of contemporary life and its yearning for something more struck a chord with listeners in an era in which traditional verities had been shaken. It didn't hurt, of course, that Stevens had lost none of his ability to craft a catchy pop melody; the album may have been full of angst, but it wasn't hard to sing along to. As a result, Tea for the Tillerman became a big seller and, for the second time in four years, its creator became a pop star.

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