Category: DSD File

Benny Carter Quartet – Summer Serenade (1980/2017) DSF DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Benny Carter Quartet
Title: Summer Serenade
Genre: Jazz
Release Date: 1980
Duration: 44:36
Quality: DSF DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: 2xHD
Source: https://www.highresaudio.com/en/album/view/kbm4uu/benny-carter-quartet-summer-serenade-remastered

Jazz is an international music and Benny Carter is one of its leading statesmen. Benny Carter has recorded so many excellent swing sessions throughout his lengthy career that it is very difficult to pick out the best ones. This quartet date (Summer Serenade) recorded August 17, 1980 for the Danish Storyville label matches his alto with pianist Kenny Drew, bassist Jesper Lundgaard and drummer Ed Thigpen for four of Carter's originals and three standards. As a bonus, Richard Boone sings the good-humored "All That Jazz." (Scott Yanow, AMG)

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Patricia Barber – NightClub (2000/2004) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             


Artist: Patricia Barber
Title: NightClub
Genre: Jazz
Release Date: 2000
Duration: 57:34
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Label: Premonition
Source: http://store.acousticsounds.com/d/95078/Patricia_Barber-NightClub-DSD_Single_Rate_28MHz64fs_Download

Nightclub was recorded at Chicago Recording Company in mid-2000 by recording engineer Jim Anderson. Done on the Sony 3348, a 32-track (16/48) digital tape recorder, and mixed down to 2-track, half-inch analog tape with Dolby SR, this was Barber's first album consisting entirely of standards. Anderson utilized mostly tube microphones (Brauner and Neumann) and John Hardy M-1 preamps, whose signal was patched directly to the tape bypassing the console. Nightclub also prominently features the CRC stairwell as a natural reverb chamber. The album was mastered by David Glasser of Airshow Mastering from the original analog mixes. From the very begining of her career, devoted fans were asking Patricia Barber to dedicate a record to standards. "These songs have always been a part of my repertoire and are a big part of who I am, but I wanted to try and define myself in a different way before making a record like this," says Barber. It is hard to argue with her approach. Armed with a press kit to die for, strong national radio support and two Top 10 Billboard Jazz recordings in a row, the timing couldn't have been better for one of her most accessible records. Fans will recognize and appreciate that within simple approaches, Barber maintains her fierce individuality. Jazz vocal traditionalists will hear an astonishing voice inside well-known melodies, giving itself over to the song. And, aficionados of the American popular songbook cannot help but appreciate hearing their music given by one of the most expressive voices in contemporary music.

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Patricia Barber – Modern Cool (1998/2002) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

             

Artist: Patricia Barber Title: Modern Cool Genre: Jazz Release Date: 1998 Duration: 01:13:00 Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz Label: Floyd Records Source: http://store.acousticsounds.com/d/135433/Patricia_Barber-Modern_Cool-DSD_Single_Rate_28MHz64fs_Download Modern Cool was recorded at Chicago Recording Company in early 1998. For many, Modern Cool is the record that brought Patricia Barber to their attention. Its success with critics and jazz fans led Blue Note Records to enter into a "joint imprint" production deal with Premonition Records, the first time they had ever done such a deal in their storied history. Done on the Sony 3348, a 32-track (16/48) digital tape recorder, and mixed down to 2-track, half-inch tape with Dolby SR, this was Barber's first album of mostly original material. Anderson utilized mostly tube microphones (Brauner and Neumann) and John Hardy M-1 preamps, whose signal was patched to the tape bypassing the console. (more…)

Eric Vloeimans, Tuur Florizoone, Jorg Brinkmann – Oliver’s Cinema (2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Eric Vloeimans, Tuur Florizoone, Jorg Brinkmann
Title: Oliver's Cinema
Genre: Jazz
Release Date: 2013
Duration: 57:18
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: Buzz
Source: https://buzz.nativedsd.com/albums/olivers-cinema

I used to think the accordion was a horrible instrument. An ugly, kitschy sound and a repertoire to match, from commercial tripe and oompah to waltzes for the elderly and circus drollery. In short, music to be given a wide berth. But developments never cease, and you suddenly notice that your opinion has changed. After years and years of studying music, mind you. Your taste buds change. It's just like with buttermilk, olives and tomatoes. As a child you hated them, and now you find you enjoy the taste. After thorough education at the dinner table, by the way. Trying a little bit, time and again. Incidentally, there are plenty of listeners who feel that mine is a horrible instrument. Loud, shrill, ugly, militaristic. Think of the Brouwer Brothers, Willy Schobben, Marty and all those other guys with their Golden Trumpets, playing Il Silencio and O mein Papa. I used to like that, but not anymore. Yes, taste remains a complex business. Back to the accordion. During one of my musical wanderings I wound up in the Belgian town of Rijkevorsel. After a concert there I was having a pint at the bar, and in this lovely Belgian atmosphere the accordion question reared its head again. Was there no accordion player to be found in Belgium that would suit me? 'But certainly', the response was, 'you want our Tuur, then!' A CD of his was put on forthwith, and the wonderful improvisations by Tuur Florizoone enchanted me on the spot. An appointment with Tuur was quickly made. One phone call, and it was like meeting my brother. This was the beginning of a new duo, that by now can look back on a long series of successful concerts. There's another instrument I'm completely in love with -- the cello. A sensual instrument, that can take over the task of a bass, but remains light and svelte. A bowed melody on the cello sounds gorgeous, like on a heavier viola, but still agile and pert. And now I'm not only a fan of the instrument, but also of some one who plays it magnificently. He knows his classics, plucks like a jazz virtuoso, bows like a prince, and doesn't shy away from electronics either. He's from our neighboring country Germany, and his name is Jrg Brinkmann.

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Netherlands Symphony Orchestra, Jan Willem de Vriend – Mendelssohn: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3 (2014) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Netherlands Symphony Orchestra, Jan Willem de Vriend
Title: Mendelssohn: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2014
Duration: 01:09:43
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: Challenge Records
Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/complete-symphonies-vol-2-symphony-nos1-3

"What is particularly amazing about the Mendelssohn symphonies is the fact that he is both harking back to old masters like Bach, and, as a child of his time, looking ahead. Especially his Italian and Scottish symphonies are pointing at the future, since, in my opinion, Mendelssohn lived in the era of discovery, of the Wanderer. Goethe came up with his young Werther, a guy who went away to discover the world and upon returning nothing looked the same. It's a bit like the Wanderer in the paintings of Caspar David Friedrich: the sea, the valley, the hills, the light -- everything looked new, fresh and different. Mendelssohn was such a Wanderer. He had read Goethe, so he travelled a lot. He went to Scotland, Italy and England where he absorbed the newness of it all. And that is exactly what you can hear in his music: astonishment, translated into music using harmonies we knew but which in his hands sounded completely fresh and new. Having said that, you can also hear an old-school musical approach. Mendelssohn sometimes uses fugues or chorales we know from older styles. He was the first to bring back those trustworthy techniques -- and that, in itself, was also new. He took those techniques on a journey and that i that his music isn't being played more often. There are Beethoven, Brahms or Schumann programs all over the place, but where is Mendelssohn? Let me repeat: where is Mendelssohn?"

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Lisa Larsson, Het Gelders Orkest, Antonello Manacorda – Berlioz: La Captive (2014) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             

Artist: Lisa Larsson, Het Gelders Orkest, Antonello Manacorda Title: Berlioz: La Captive Genre: Classical Release Date: 2014 Duration: 48:34 Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz Label: Challenge Records Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/la-captive Have you ever heard of Jean-Baptiste Guirod, Giullaume Ross-Despraux or Eugne Prvost? Apart from Prvost, perhaps, they have mostly been consigned to the depths of oblivion. But these were composers who won the coveted Prix de Rome, an award that had been instituted by Napoleon himself in 1803, in the period from 1827 to 1829. And in doing so, they whipped the prize right out from under the nose of Berlioz, who had competed for it just as often as they had. It might offer Berlioz some -- posthumous -- solace to know that he was in excellent company; Ravel, Debussy and Bizet were also to be denied the prize. The judging system for the prize, which offered little scope for groundbreaking composers, has come in for severe criticism over the years. In the words of Edgar Varse, the prize 'produced so much insipid fruit that nowadays we can barely even remember their names'. It was Berlioz himself, in his highly readable and entertaining autobiography, who explained all about the prize's requirements and what the prize itself involved. The winner received an allowance for five years, but this was on condition that he would spend the first two years at the Acadmie de France in Rome, use the third year for travelling through Germany and survive the remaining two years 'doing what he could to promote himself and avoid dying from hunger' in Paris. Before winning the prize in 1830 with the fairly scholastic cantata La mort de Sardanapale, Berlioz had already submitted attempts in the form of La mort d'Orphe (1827), Herminie (1828) and La mort de Cloptre (1829). In 1827, his Mort d'Orphe had been condemned as unplayable by the pianist who had to perform the piano reduction -- one of the jury's requirements. Berlioz seems to have been slightly more successful in the following year: the piano version of Herminie was admittedly playable, but the work was outstripped by the submission made by Ross-Despraux and only came second. The cantata Herminie would survive, however, not least because Berlioz derived the ide fixe from his Symphonie Fantastique from the work. The cantata, to a text by Pierre-Ange Vieillard, was inspired by Tasso's 'Gerusalemme liberata'. This was an epic set during the Crusades, recounting the tale of the Christian knight Tancredi and his love for the Muslim warrior Clorinda. In the passage set by Berlioz, the central figure is Princess Erminia of Antioch, who was also in love with Tancredi. She leaves Jerusalem -- dressed in Clorinda's armour -- to aid Tancredi, who has been wounded following a duel with the Muslim knight Argantes (more…)

Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden – Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 1 (2015) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden
Title: Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 1
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2015
Duration: 51:20
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: Challenge Records
Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/cc72556bruckner-symphony-no-4

Anton Bruckner, born in the Austrian village of Ansfelden on 4 September 1824, first worked as assistant schoolmaster at an unsightly school in an equally unsightly hamlet not far away called Windhaag, near Linz. When he took his last breath on 11 October 1896 as one of the greatest composers Austria ever produced, in a tiny chamber (Kustodenstckl) of the Viennese palace of Belvedere that had kindly been placed at his disposal by the imperial court, the finale of his Ninth Symphony was well under way but still unfinished. Although the rapid advance of industrialisation has made great incursions here and there on the Upper Austrian landscape, and although the ravages of time have eaten away at the integrity of Bruckner's Lebensraum, there are still more than enough sites to be found which could certainly have formed a backdrop to his early symphonies. In that sense, listening to the First Symphony is a trip of discovery through Bruckner's countryside, within the triangle formed by Ansfelden (birthplace), St. Florian (with its famous Stift, where Bruckner, first as a choirboy and later as a mature musician, found the much-needed distance from the workaday world to play the extremely beautiful organ) and lastly Linz, with its majestic Cathedral, where Bruckner held the not inconsiderable post of organist until 1868. The powerful organ tones, with their unsuspected force, would be heard like glorious sound pillars in his symphonic epos.

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Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden – Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 6 (2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden
Title: Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 6
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2013
Duration: 57:14
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: Challenge Records
Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/symphony-no-6

In the early days of the symphonies history, there was nothing like the meticulousness of our approach to Bruckner's work. On February 26, 1899, Gustav Mahler gave in Vienna the first performance of the Sixth, in his own version, in which he substantially reworked both the instrumentation and notes and showed no aversion to sweeping cuts. The first printed score of Bruckner's Sixth appeared in the summer of 1899, however it deviated greatly from the original work. Largely responsible for this was Josef Schalk (1857-1900), a highly respected conductor in Vienna and an early Bruckner admirer (Bruckner often referred to him as "Herr Generalissimus"). Did Bruckner ever hear his "keckste" composition performed? That cannot be answered with any certainty. We know that during a concert in Vienna on February 11, 1883, the Vienna Philharmonic performed only the Adagio and Scherzo, conducted by Wilhelm Jahn, but the composer possibly heard the complete symphony during the rehearsals -- or perhaps in or around October 1882 during the orchestra's

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Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden – Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 3 (2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             

Artist: Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden Title: Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 3 Genre: Classical Release Date: 2013 Duration: 59:33 Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz Label: Challenge Records Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/symphony-no-3 Bruckner - Symphony no. 3 Anton Bruckner meticulously noted it in his calendar: autumn 1872, first rejection of the performance of the Third Symphony in Vienna; autumn 1875, second rejection; September 27, 1877, third rejection. Thanks to the efforts of his good friend Johann (von Ritter) Herbeck (who had conducted the premiere of Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony), Vienna's Gesellschaft der Musikfreunde decided to programme the work on December 16, 1877, the second concert in the Gesellschaft series. Herbeck was to conduct the Vienna Philharmonic for the occasion in the "Golden Hall" of Vienna's Musikverein. On October 28, however, Herbeck unexpectedly died, putting the premiere in doubt. That same evening, Bruckner sought the support of the influential Reichstag delegate and later Bruckner biographer August Gllerich, a close friend of Nikolaus Dumba, the Gesellschaft's president. His efforts paid off, and the performance of the Third Symphony was saved. Alas, no conductor could be found who wanted to perform the work, so Bruckner, who was not used to leading an orchestra, took on the -- to his mind, thankless -- task. The results were predictable. Already in the rehearsals, things started going wrong. The orchestra's musicians showed scant respect for the poor composer. They sabotaged the proceedings by intentionally playing out of tune and weaving odd notes and ornaments into the music. They stubbornly refused to repeat certain phrases and repeatedly laughed at Bruckner to his face. The great composer was the helpless conductor who baptized one of the most impressive compositions in music history in an exceedingly unpleasant atmosphere created largely by notorious troublemakers. Aside from the unfortunate rehearsals, other aspects of the concert were unfavourable for Bruckner: before the intermission, Joseph Hellmesberger conducted a programme that, to put it mildly, was excessively long: Beethoven's Egmont Overture and the Violin Concerto in D minor by Louis Spohr followed multiple arias from Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro and Peter von Winter's Das unterbrochene Opernfest (already largely forgotten). Were that not enough, there was Beethoven's Meeresstille und glu?ckliche Fahrt before Bruckner could present the Third Symphony. (more…)

Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden – Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 8 (2012) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz

             


Artist: Netherlands Radio Philharmonic Orchestra,Jaap van Zweden
Title: Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 8
Genre: Classical
Release Date: 2012
Duration: 01:19:24
Quality: High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD128/5.64MHz
Label: Challenge Records
Source: https://challengerecords.nativedsd.com/albums/symphony-no-8

Despite the big differences between them, there is a certain kinship between Bruckner's 'official' nine symphonies (the ones he decided to call 'valid'): the broadly expansive themes with their lengthy build-up of tension and the expectant tremolo of the strings (first introduced by Beethoven in his Ninth Symphony) at the beginning, from which the main theme wells up. Bruckner often gives the singsong, sometimes distinctly lyrical second theme a contrapuntal second voice. The third theme, on the other hand, is often monolithic, full of clenched energy, that bursts out in unison and goes on to develop a huge rhythmic force. Then there are the long drawn-out Adagios with their heavenly cantilenas and the starkly contrasting, waggish Scherzos, almost smelling of earth. They are all just as characteristic of Bruckner's compositions as the broadness of the codas in the outer movements, introduced by a soft roll of the timpanis. But despite the similarities, all his symphonies are fundamentally and completely different and are certainly not interchangeable. This can be said of each of the movements separately and of the entire work.

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