Sort articles by: Date | Most Rates | Most Views | Comments | Alphabet
» Articles for October 2017 Year » page 6
Barclay James Harvest - Gone To Earth (1977/2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Artist: Barclay James Harvest
Title: Gone To Earth
Genre: Rock, Prog Rock, Art Rock
Label: © Polydor | Esoteric Recordings
Release Date: 1977/2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: DVD Audio
Duration: 00:40:13
Recorded: March to June 1977, Strawberry Studios, Stockport


Gone To Earth is an album by the English rock group Barclay James Harvest released in 1977. It reached #30 in the UK charts, but in Germany it peaked at #10 and stayed for 197 weeks in the German album charts. As of 2011 it is ranked #6 on the list of longest running albums in the German album charts. Only the My Fair Lady soundtrack and albums by Simon & Garfunkel (Greatest Hits), The Beatles (1962-1966), Pink Floyd (Wish You Were Here) and Andrea Berg (Best Of) spent more weeks in the charts. It was the band's largest selling album, eventually selling more than a million copies worldwide.
  • 0
Johann Sebastian Bach - The French Suites - Murray Perahia (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Сomposer: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Artist: Murray Perahia
Title: Bach, J.S. - French Suites BWV 812–817
Genre: Classical
Label: © Deutsche Grammophon
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 01:31:34
Recording: Berlin, Funkhaus Nalepastrasse, Saal 1, July 2013


Murray Perahia’s performances of Bach on the modern piano have long been renowned for their poetic clarity and profound sense of humanity. Turning now to the six French Suites, he can look back on a lifelong association, and ever-deepening relationship, with this music. “Bach has always been central to my life,” Perahia reflects. “Although I played a few pieces as a child, the first time I heard Bach in concert was when Pablo Casals conducted the St Matthew Passion at Carnegie Hall when I was about fifteen. This left an indelible impression on me. “The way he performed it was very human. At that time, the early 1960s, we often heard Bach performed in a mechanical way. Orchestras, if they played Bach at all, would play it very strictly. Many critics and also some great pianists were against playing Bach on the piano – the harpsichord was considered the only valid vehicle for it. That felt discouraging – so I saw it as a challenge. I took up the harpsichord for two years and tried to apply its lessons to my piano playing, but it wasn’t an easy fit. Gradually I found my own way towards playing Bach on the piano.” Perahia has previously recorded the Partitas, the English Suites, some of the keyboard concertos and the Goldberg Variations; adding the French Suites is, he says, a natural progression. Some he has played since childhood. “The French Suites are Bach on the highest level,” he says, “even though it’s music that could be approached by children. Five of them were already included in the Anna Magdalena Notebook of 1722 so they could be used as teaching material. They are nevertheless quite profound. I don’t think Bach wrote one note that didn’t have wider meanings and that wasn’t to be tackled with all one’s heart and soul. “I find the first three Suites, in the minor keys, are very sad in a tender way; the Sarabandes are particularly touching. The second three, in the major keys, are very joyful, indeed gleeful. The Fifth, the bestknown, has a Gigue that is pure joy, and the Sixth is on the level of heaven, or going there. “The French Suites are different from the English Suites and Partitas in that they are, on the whole, more delicate,” he adds. “They are often in a two- or three-voice texture. That and the lack of obvious bravura suggest that they may have been written for the clavichord. On the other hand, the more dramatic Gigues – as, for example, in the First and Second, with all its trills – might challenge that assumption.” The “French” elements range from notational conventions to expressive devices: “Accenting the second beat in a Sarabande is a French characteristic,” Perahia explains, “as is the double-dotting in certain passages, with quick, light runs and elegant phrasing.” Each suite has a core of four movements: Allemande, Courante, Sarabande and Gigue. To these Bach adds gavottes, bourrées, minuets and more. “For me, the voice-leading – the harmony created by the counterpoint – is really the most interesting aspect of this music,” says Perahia, “but the dance rhythms are absolutely essential: they’re the lifespring of the suites.” Most of the movements are in binary form: two halves, each repeated. Perahia chooses to observe all the repeats: “The second time round, I like to play variants – for example, adding ornamentation,” he says. He also favours using, judiciously, the piano’s sustaining pedal, which some other performers avoid in Bach because it did not exist on the harpsichord. For him, that argument seems too draconian. “If you hear the harpsichord up close, the damping of the strings is not so complete, so there’s a constant resonance that resembles a pedal effect,” he points out. “Or go into a church and listen to an organ: that’s the last thing from dry. Dryness just wasn’t a Baroque concept and to my mind the way the harmonies interact is best effected if there’s a slight pedal.” Playing Bach has had a profound impact on his approach to composers such as Beethoven and Chopin, whose music, he reflects, would have been “unthinkable” without Bach. “Bach permeates Western music, on many levels,” he says. “It’s the beginning of music that is cohesive, in which every note is related to every other note, and not in an academic way. And it’s so joyful, so full of buoyancy and spirituality, that it affects all of the music written after it.” In the end, though, Perahia’s Bach playing is inspired by a very personal devotion. “There was a period when I couldn’t play the piano because of a finger infection that wouldn’t heal,” he remembers. “I had to spend a long time away from the instrument. But, because I love music so much, I had to be involved with it, and the solace and consolation that I found was from Bach. I studied Bach every day and it would nourish me. For that I’m very grateful.” --Jessica Duchen
  • 0
Johann Sebastian Bach - Complete Sonatas & Partitas for Violin Solo - Kyung-Wha Chung (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Сomposer: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Artist: Kyung-Wha Chung
Title: Bach, J.S. - Complete Sonatas & Partitas for Violin Solo
Genre: Classical
Label: © Warner Classics
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 02:17:08
Recorded: 19–21.II, 24–26.III, 3–5.IV & 30.V.–1.VI.2016, St George’s Bristol


“I’m delighted to announce that I am so happy to be returning to the recording studio after many years for a series of exciting artistic projects. The first of these is the solo Sonatas & Partitas of J.S.Bach: a monumental task. This is the unending quest of my musical journey.” – Kyung Wha Chung
After a career break of more than a decade she has announced the decision to return to the recording studio. With this album she fulfils a lifelong dream of recording the complete violin solo works by J.S. Bach, a project very close to her heart. The album, recorded at St George’s Bristol, will showcase Kyung Wha Chung as the maverick of the violin that she is with her inimitable and timeless sound.
  • 0
Johann Sebastian Bach - Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 3, 5 & Air - The George Enescu Philharmonic Orchestra, Cristian Mandeal (2002) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Сomposer: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
Artist: The George Enescu Philharmonic Orchestra, Cristian Mandeal
Title: Bach, J.S. - Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 3, 5 & Air
Genre: Classical
Label: © AIX Records
Release Date: 2002
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: DVD Audio
Duration: 00:39:56
Recorded: 2001


My first reaction on reading the label of this recording was to be a little apprehensive of a full symphony orchestra playing these works, since a large string orchestra playing particularly the Brandenburg #3 can sound like turbulent if agreeable sonic mush. But, not to worry, only the leading players are involved in the Brandenburgs, and they play as well as anyone has ever played these works, with a nice awareness of original performance practice but with rich tone and a lyric sense of phrase. Tempi are about the current norm, somewhat brisk by older standards. The ‘slow movement problem’ of #3 is solved by having the harpsichordist improvise some runs and arpeggios, coming in for a landing on the famous cadential chords, and then it’s off to the races again. The harpsichordist, pianist Nicolae Licaret, plays the demanding part in #5 as well as I’ve ever heard it played. This takes courage because before high resolution recording you couldn’t hear all the mistakes, and they all made them, including the great Veyron-LaCroix. Consider the extreme difficulty of this part: the harpsichordist, playing both the continuo and concertato keyboard parts never stops playing, not for one second, during the entire work. He probably plays ten times as many notes as in the Beethoven Emperor Concerto.
I once tried to start an argument by stating flatly that the Brandenburg Concerto #5 is the greatest single piece of music ever written (at least in the 15 to 40 minutes instrumental class), but failed because after a little discussion everybody in the room came to agree with me.
To see how this disk would play in a DVD (video) player I put it in my new Sony DVD/SACD player which contains a 96kHz D/A audio chip. There is also a firm notice in the booklet that it does not (sniff!) play DVD-Audio disks. The AIX logo (unfortunately not a silent one!) appeared on the screen and then the audio set-up menu, and when I didn’t click anything, almost at once the 96kHz PCM stereo track began to play. Even in two channel stereo there was a magical clarity, every note of the harpsichord audible but not overly prominent, and the clear separation of the ripieno from the concertino. On the screen is a playlist of tracks including entries to other menus. Upon returning to the audio set-up menu, I selected DTS surround sound and there I was, seated at the harpsichord, with the ripieno to the left (front) and the concertino to the right (rear). Every note of every instrument was brilliantly clear. I’ve never heard this music like this before, with the interplay between the soloists and the string orchestra so clear and distinct. I found myself listening to the second solo viola in #3, a part I’d never noticed before. Certainly I had never appreciated the complexity of this work which before had always been little more than an agreeable bouncy muddle of string sound.
As if this wasn’t good enough, on a true DVD-Audio player the same selection of tracks is available in significantly clearer sound.
There will probably be those people for whom music is exclusively a "spectator sport" who will condemn this surround sound as a useless gimmick. They will insist that we always hear music coming from the stage and that’s how it should always be recorded. But that’s not true. The composer, the conductor, and the musicians hear the music close-up, all around them. Those of us who always wanted to be performing musicians want to hear music that way, and it’s a perfectly valid intellectual and æsthetic experience. And on this disk you have your choice.
For the aria from Suite #3, we do hear an apparently larger string ensemble with harpsichord up front on the lute register joining the pizzicato low strings in the accompaniment to produce a beautiful sound. As usual, the work is played too slow, but there is no sentimentalising, just generous breathing phrases and a rich cantilena. --Paul Shoemaker, MusicWeb
  • 0
Johann Sebastian Bach - The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080 - Rachel Podger, Brecon Baroque (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Сomposer: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685 - 1750)
Artist: Rachel Podger, Brecon Baroque
Title: Bach, J S: The Art of Fugue, BWV 1080
Genre: Classical
Label: © Channel Classics Records
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: channelclassics.com
Duration: 01:10:00
Recording: Church of Saint Jude-on-the-Hill, 15-17 December 2015


Questions about the implied instrumentation are never going to be answered definitively. Certainly, virtually all the cycle is set out in such a way that it can be played on the keyboard, but the open score format of the original invites interpretation from any potential instrumental combination (or, indeed, even just a soundless reading by the highly trained musician). This question immediately leads on to another how are we expected to listen to this music? Are we meant to hear a sequence of virtual events or is it to be one event in a single span of time? Is it perhaps the filling out of contrapuntal and motivic possibilities that are all potentially simultaneous and which only have to be strung out in time to render them humanly perceivable? Much of this suggest that the work implies a sort of cyclic time, experienced from the point of view of eternity - in other words, the sort of time that we might imagine God experiences, superior to the messy narrative of human linear time. Yet, there are always human, worldly elements, such as the allusions to French style in Contrapunctus 6, the rhetorical pauses in the very first Contrapunctus, or the playful flow of the mirror fugues or some of the canons. This residue of human habitation is perhaps what distinguishes Bachs fugal works from the fugal (or ricercar) tradition of previous composers and in which later composers heard a voice speaking directly to them, a voice that shared at least some aspects of the modern world, even if it was entirely suffused with the sense of an overwhelming and all-embracing godly order.
  • 0
Bach & Telemann - Sacred Cantatas - Philippe Jaroussky, Freiburger Barockorchester (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Сomposer: Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750), Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767)
Artist: Philippe Jaroussky, Freiburger Barockorchester
Title: Bach & Telemann: Sacred Cantatas
Genre: Classical
Label: © Parlophone Records Ltd. A Warner Music Group Company
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 01:14:50
Recorded: Ensemblehaus Freiburg, 12–19 December 2015

For her first recording on Erato as a newly-signed exclusive artist, Nathalie Stutzmann conducts her superb Orfeo 55 musicians playing on Baroque instruments, while singing some of Handel’s most virtuosic arias, all with a rare mastery of both arts – neither one in the shadow of the other.
Heroes from the Shadows makes stars of the unfairly overlooked roles – from Arsamene to Zenobia – who sing Handel’s hidden operatic jewels: Cornelia from Giulio Cesare (‘Son nata’ in duet with star countertenor Philippe Jaroussky as her guest), Dardano’s stately ‘Pena tiranna’ from Amadigi di Gaula, and the sublime, intimate ‘Senti, bell’idol mio’ sung by Claudio in Silla. Nathalie Stutzmann also relinquishes vocal duties to conduct Orfeo 55 in ravishing instrumental music: sinfonias from Poro, Partenope, Scipione and Serse.
  • 0
Anton Bruckner - Die 3 Messen - Chor und Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Eugen Jochum (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Сomposer: Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)
Artist: Chor und Symphonieorchester des Bayerischen Rundfunks, Eugen Jochum
Title: Bruckner - Die 3 Messen
Genre: Classical, Choral
Label: © Deutsche Grammophon
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 02:28:08
Recording: July 1962, February 1971 & January 1972, Herkules Saal, Munich, Germany

''What seraphic music. It must be Bruckner'', remarked a friend who entered the room as I was playing this recording. I cannot recommend this . . . too highly, both as performances and recordings. Seraphic is the word. Bruckner's three settings of the Mass are enough in themselves to convert the heathen. I cannot possibly decide which of them I like most, though my head tells me that No. 2 in E minor, with its wind-only accompaniment, is the greatest. What is obvious is that they are the work of a master of choral music, who knew infallibly what effects he wished to create and how to create them, who had the acoustics of a cathedral inbuilt into his notes as he put them on paper and who can rightly be compared with Palestrina in the purity and emotional fervour of his art.
The recordings were made between 1963 and 1972 and come now as a wonderful memorial tribute to Eugen Jochum. His conducting of Bruckner's symphonies was always admired but he had rivals there who could provide alternative routes to the towering peaks. I cannot believe he has a peer in this sacred music. The transfers to CD are magnificent and allow us to hear every nuance of the singing of the Bavarian Radio Chorus in the Masses . . . . The 1971 performance of the E minor Mass has not previously been issued in Britain, and it is of the highest quality, with most sensitive and expressive oboe playing.
If you play the beginning of the Mass in F minor you will obtain an immediate impression of how good these performances are and of the intensely moving nature of the music. Here is the symphonic Bruckner in all his heaven-scaling rapture but without some of the repetitious features which deter some listeners (though not those who are fully prepared to enter his world). The soloists are good in all the performances but Maria Stader and Kim Borg excel in this Mass. --Gramophone
  • 0
Anton Bruckner - The Complete Symphonies - Staatskapelle Berlin, Daniel Barenboim (2016) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/48kHz

Сomposer: Anton Bruckner (1824-1896)
Artist: Staatskapelle Berlin, Daniel Barenboim
Title: Bruckner: The Complete Symphonies
Genre: Classical
Label: © Peral Music
Release Date: 2016
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 48kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 09:08:16
Recorded: 2010, 2012, Vienna, Berlin

Conductor Daniel Barenboim presents the third set of the complete Bruckner symphonies of his career, this time recorded live in 2010 and only available on this digital download. Barenboim says the Staatskapelle Berlin's Wagnerian opera tradition brings a “certain freedom in the playing, with a certain vocal (as opposed to purely instrumental) quality” that makes this latest cycle “very different from the other two versions.”

'One of the characteristics of the Bruckner symphonies is that the music does not start as being 'here'. It rather becomes. In the later symphonies, you very often feel that this is a kind of delayed action. There’s no music, there are just strings trembling before the music actually starts..." --Daniel Barenboim
  • 0
Astrud Gilberto with Stanley Turrentine - Gilberto with Turrentine (1971/2013) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Astrud Gilberto with Stanley Turrentine
Title: Gilberto with Turrentine
Genre: Jazz, Vocal Jazz, Vocal Pop, Bossa Nova, Brazilian Jazz, Mood Music, World Fusion, AM Pop
Label: © CTI Records, a division of Creed Taylor, Inc. | King Record Co., Ltd.
Release Date: 1971/2013
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: e-Onkyo
Duration: 00:36:52
Recorded: January 13 (#9,10), February 1 (#4), February 4 (#1,3,7), March 19 (#2,5), and April 6 (#6,8), 1971 at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey

Gilberto with Turrentine is an album by Brazilian samba and bossa nova singer Astrud Gilberto and American saxophonist Stanley Turrentine featuring performances recorded in 1971 released on the CTI label.
  • 0
Anekdoten - Until All The Ghosts Are Gone (2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Artist: Anekdoten
Title: Until All The Ghosts Are Gone
Genre: Rock, Prog Rock, Art Rock, Psychedelic Rock
Label: © Virtalevy/Anekdoten
Release Date: 2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: anekdoten.shop.textalk.se
Duration: 00:46:26
Recorded: Atlantis Grammofon, Sisu Sound, Magic City Studios, Pete's Place, Tjep, Mellotron Archives,Travesty Studios

After delivering a steady stream of music between 1993 and 2007, Swedish progressive vets Anekdoten seemingly vanished. A 2-disc anthology surfaced in 2009 and a few live dates occurred, but otherwise, silence. Not until 2013 did the band begin circulating updates about a follow-up to 2007’s A Time of Day. Posts on the band’s webpage clearly conveyed the group’s desire to not only release new material, but to produce something worthwhile. That level of commitment is commendable, but 8 years is still a long time for fans to wait. Imagine the anticipation that came with the band finally re-emerging with Until All the Ghosts are Gone.
Throughout these 6 new songs, Anekdoten’s roots as a King Crimson cover band are still noticeable. “Shooting Star”, which may be the band’s strongest opener since “Monolith”, recalls King Crimson’s Red-era dissonance and drive with its knotty riffs, towering Mellotron and immense bass tones. The dense notes of “Get Out Alive” erupt with atmospheric intensity akin to “The Court of the Crimson King” and guitarist Nicklas Barker’s soaring solo is beholden to Robert Fripp’s more melodic moments. The influences are apparent, but this does not deter the quartet from exploring some original terrain. The latter half of the record’s centerpiece “Writing on the Wall” aptly reflects the band’s modern tendencies. Following an opening section replete with swirling guitar and hovering sheets of vintage-sounding organ, Barker’s lead guitar diverts the proceedings toward airier passages, where the ensemble employs a hitherto unseen mastery of dynamics and space.
The guest appearances here are worth mentioning. Ex-Opeth keyboardist Per Wiberg mans the Hammond on “Shooting Star” and virtuoso flautist Theo Travis (Gong, Steven Wilson’s solo outings) adds a pastoral touch to the pining “If It All Comes Down To You”. Travis’ flute work reappears to complement Marty Willson-Piper’s 12-string guitar on the title track before being overtaken by the wild percussion and manic saxophone of the chaotic, closing instrumental “Our Days Are Numbered”.
Many will point out the record’s similarities to Opeth’s recent output, which arguably go beyond Wiberg’s guest spot. Before claiming plagiarism though, consider that both bands do stem from the same culture and perhaps are drawing inspiration from the same or similar source material. Also, it should probably be noted that Anekdoten are part of the earliest waves of the Scandinavian prog revival and played in this style long before Åkerfeldt and company redirected into like-minded territory.
Overall, the missteps are few. It is a pleasure to report that Anekdoten made the right choice by abdicating expedition in pursuit of quality, despite the grueling delay. The fruit of their labor sits comfortably alongside their finest works and deserves to be recognized among the great albums of 2015. --Brandon Nelson, Sputnikmusic.com
  • 0
Dear visitor, you have not login. We recommend you to REGISTER and LOGIN to gain access to the full resource on our website.