Sort articles by: Date | Most Rates | Most Views | Comments | Alphabet
» Articles for December 2015 Year
Yusef Lateef - The Gentle Giant (1972/2011) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: Yusef Lateef
Title: The Gentle Giant
Genre: Jazz, Hard Bop, Jazz Funk, Soul Jazz
Label: © Atlantic Records
Release Date: 1972/2011
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 37:15
Recorded: Regent Sound Studios, NYC, April 7, 9 1970; Atlantic Studios, NYC, September 1, 2 1971

Yusef Lateef's music from the early '70s commands large doses of both appeal and skepticism. At a time when funk and fusion were merging with the intensely volatile and distrustful mood of the U.S., Lateef's brand of Detroit soul garnered new fans, and turned away those who preferred his earlier hard bop jazz or world music innovations. Thus The Gentle Giant is an appropriate title, as Lateef's levitational flute looms large over the rhythm & blues beats central to the equation. Kenny Barron's Fender Rhodes electric piano is also a sign of the times, an entry point introducing him to the contemporary jazz scene, and on that point alone is historically relevant. The post-Bitches Brew, pre-Weather Report/Headhunters time period is to be considered, and how this music put Lateef in many respects to the forefront of the movement. While inconsistent and at times uneven, there's more to praise than damn in the grooves and unique musicianship he offers with this small ensemble of focused and singular-minded players. At once funky and cool, Barron's "Nubian Lady" sets the tone out of the gate, the tune totally trumping Herbie Mann's Memphis Underground/Push Push style. The similar-sounding "Jungle Plum" is more danceable, simpler, and less attractive. While "Aftican Song" is also in this vein, it is less about the continent in the title as it is reflective of the era, and a slower number. Perhaps that actual title and the sleigh bell-driven "Below Yellow Bell" could have been reversed, for it is more Afrocentric, with Lateef's wordless vocal counterpoint closer to sounds of the savanna over a baroque rhythm & blues. "Hey Jude," under-produced to the point of inaudibility at the outset (the caveat given is "do not adjust the playback level on your audio equipment, readjust your mind"), busts out on the incessantly repeated "na na" chorus with the Sweet Inspirations doing the honors. The other tracks lay low, as Lateef and Al "Tootie" Heath's flutes and Kermit Moore's cello go into late-night mode for "Lowland Lullabye," "The Poor Fisherman" explores the leader's interest in Asian sounds with call and response, and "Queen of the Night" is a two-minute shortie with Eric Gale's modulated guitar mixing up meters of 4/4 and 3/4 in a slightly macabre way. This recording was produced in the middle of Lateef's commercial crossroads phase that started with the Atlantic label issue Yusef Lateef's Detroit in 1969 and ended in 1977 with the CTI release Autophysiopsychic. Though these tracks are potent reminders of how jazz was willfully being manipulated by the record companies -- Creed Taylor in particular -- this album is clear evidence of how great a musician Yusef Lateef was, but not in the context of his best music. --AllMusic Review by Michael G. Nastos
  • 20
Wild Bill Davis - Free, Frantic And Funky (1965/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Artist: Wild Bill Davis
Title: Free, Frantic And Funky
Genre: Jazz, Soul Jazz, Dixieland, Swing, Jazz Blues
Label: © RCA Records, a division of Sony Music Entertainment
Release Date: 1965/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 00:38:30
Recorded: September 22, 1964 - December 3, 1964, RCA Victor's Studio B, New York City


With the dynamic, swirling sounds of his Hammond B-3 organ, Wild Bill Davis provided a bridge from the big band swing of the 1930s and '40s to the organ-driven R&B of the 1950s and early '60s. Together with guitarist Floyd Smith and drummer Chris Columbus, Davis set the framework for the jazz organ combo sound. Initially a guitarist, Davis made his debut with Milt Larkin's band in 1939. The group is remembered for the double-saxophone attack of Eddie "Cleanhead" Vinson and Arnett Cobb. Davis, who was inspired by the guitar playing of Freddie Green, remained with the band until 1942. Moving to the piano, Davis joined Louis Jordan & His Tympany 5 in 1945. By then, he had already attracted attention as a skilled writer and arranger. He later furnished original material and arrangements for both Duke Ellington and Count Basie. He was scheduled to record his arrangement of "April in Paris" with the Count Basie Orchestra in 1955, but was unable to make it to the recording sessions. Recorded without his participation, the tune went on to be a Top 30 pop hit. Intrigued by the organ playing of Fats Waller and Count Basie, Davis began to experiment with the Hammond B-3. He soon developed his unique approach. "I thought of (the organ) as a replacement in clubs for a big band," he said during a late-'80s interview. Although he left Jordan's band after five years to form his own trio, Davis periodically returned to play special engagements. Although eclipsed by succeeding jazz organists, including Jimmy Smith and Bill Doggett in the late '50s, and Booker T. Jones in the '60s, Davis remained active until his death from a heart attack in August 1995. His summer appearances in Atlantic City, New Jersey were an annual treat for almost three decades. A native of Moorestown, New Jersey, Davis studied music at Tuskegee University and Wiley College in Texas. --Artist Biography by Craig Harris
  • 0
Titi Robin - Taziri (2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/44.1kHz

Artist: Titi Robin
Title: Taziri
Genre: World, Fusion, Folk Jazz, Moroccan
Label: © World Village/harmonia mundi
Release Date: 2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 44,1kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 00:52:14
Recorded: novembre 2014 au studio La Buissonne à Pernes-Les-Fontaines


An explorer of his own universe which couldn't be further from pre-formatted labels and fantasized cultural mixes, this album takes Titi Robin along the ridge trail around the Mediterranean with, at his side, Mehdi Nassouli, an enlightened travelling companion who brings with him his knowledge of Moroccan music. Music lovers will recognise in Taziri the legacy of other multi-secular forms of music such as the African source from which blues sprang. But, truth be told, the aesthetic alchemy of this album, which oscillates between dances and a form of gentle nostalgia, goes far beyond that. It is also an initiatory journey and a philosophical manifesto, since through the artistic radicalism of his author, we can hear the eternal beauty of the world.
  • 80
Tigran Hamasyan - Luys i Luso (2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Artist: Tigran Hamasyan
Title: Luys i Luso: Hymns, Sharakans and Cantos
Genre: Jazz, Folk, World, Contemporary Jazz, Classical, Choral, Armenian Sacred Music
Label: © ECM Records GmbH | ECM Player
Release Date: 2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: Qobuz
Duration: 01:15:58
Recorded: October 2014 at Argo Recording Studio, Yerevan

Luys i Luso – “Light from Light” – is Tigran Hamasyan’s first ECM album, a spellbinding exploration of Armenian sacred music, featuring the prodigiously gifted pianist with the Yerevan State Chamber Choir. Repertoire includes Armenian hymns, sharakans and cantos from the 5th to the 20th century, all newly arranged for voices and improvising pianist by Hamasyan himself. The album was recorded in Yerevan last October, and produced by Manfred Eicher.
  • 100
The Monkees - Greatest Hits (1995/2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/96kHz

Artist: The Monkees
Title: Greatest Hits
Genre: Pop Rock, AM Pop, Psychedelic/Garage, Sunshine Pop
Label: © Rhino Entertainment
Release Date: 1995/2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 96kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 32:36
Recorded: 1966–1987


This collection of The Monkees' Greatest Hits includes all of the group's Top 10 singles, their '80s comeback singles and a few rare gems.
Assembled in Los Angeles in 1966 by Robert "Bob" Rafelson and Bert Schneider for the American television series The Monkees, which aired from 1966 to 1968, the musical acting quartet was composed of Americans Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork, and Englishman Davy Jones.
The Monkees had many international hits which are still heard on pop and oldies stations. These include "I'm a Believer", "(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone", "Daydream Believer", "Last Train to Clarksville", and "Pleasant Valley Sunday".
  • 100
The Beach Boys - The Beach Boys In Concert (1973/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: The Beach Boys
Title: The Beach Boys In Concert
Genre: Rock, Rock & Roll, AM Pop, Sunshine Pop
Label: © Brother Records
Release Date: 1973/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 01:14:19
Recorded: Winter 1972 and Summer 1973


Although somewhat unimaginatively titled, 1973's Beach Boys in Concert is significantly more than a hastily compiled live collection of hits. To the contrary, the set includes highlights from the band's earliest sides ("Surfer Girl") through to the groundbreaking Smile era ("Good Vibrations" and "Heroes and Villains") as well as more concurrent material ("Sail On Sailor" and "Marcella"). These are complemented by a generous representation of deeper cuts including "You Still Believe in Me" from Pet Sounds, "Let the Wind Blow" from Wild Honey (1968), as well as later tracks like "Leaving This Town" and "Funky Pretty." The song "We Got Love" was originally recorded and penciled in for inclusion on Holland, but the laid-back rocker didn't make that release and instead makes its debut here.
It's important to note that the incarnation of the "touring" Beach Boys captured circa 1972 and 1973 does not include contributions from founding member and spiritual leader Brian Wilson. By this time the band's personnel had expanded, featuring Blondie Chaplin (guitar/vocals) and Ricky Fataar (drums). Carl Wilson (guitar/vocals) stumbled upon the pair during their tenure in the band Flame, eventually procuring them for this harder-edged version of the group which Carl had begun molding in the absence of brother Brian. He also steps in vocally for Brian on standout renditions of "Caroline No," "Good Vibrations," and a co-lead vocal with Al Jardine (guitar/vocals) on an absolutely breathtaking "Don't Worry Baby" that easily rivals the original. Other notable performances include a poignant reading of "The Trader," as well as the upbeat driving rocker "Darlin'." Although present, Dennis Wilson (electric piano/backing vocals) offers no solo. Sadly, his most notable contribution is the brief spoken introduction to "Surfin' USA." Beach Boys in Concert was the final live album to be issued -- excluding archival vault releases -- capturing the seminal American combo as a viable, hard-working rock & roll band with timeless material instead of the parody that Mike Love so perfectly embodied during their final years. This is the way the Beach Boys deserve to be remembered. --AllMusic Review by Lindsay Planer
  • 0
The Beach Boys - Today! (1965/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz


Artist: The Beach Boys
Title: The Beach Boys Today!
Genre: Pop Rock, Rock & Roll, Surf, Hot Rod
Label: © Capitol Records
Release Date: 1965/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 29:39
Recorded: June 22, 1964–January 19, 1965, United Western Recorders, Gold Star Studios, and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood


Newly remastered for vinyl and in hi-res by Kevin Gray from the original master tapes, The Beach Boys Today! is presented here in stereo.
The album is the eighth by the band, and featured hits such as "Do You Wanna Dance?", "When I Grow Up (To Be a Man)", and "Dance, Dance, Dance". The album peaked at #4 on the US Billboard 200 chart, and the production hints at the more mature depth that would appear on albums such as Pet Sounds.
  • 0
The Beach Boys - Surfer Girl (1963/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: The Beach Boys
Title: Surfer Girl
Genre: Pop Rock, Rock & Roll, Surf, Hot Rod
Label: © Capitol Records
Release Date: 1963/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 25:55
Recorded: May 9, June 12; July 16 – unknown July dates 1963б United Western Recorders, Hollywood


Newly remastered for vinyl and in hi-res by Kevin Gray from the original master tapes, Surfer Girl is presented here in stereo.
The stereo editions of Surfer Girl were originally mixed in stereo by their own preferred engineer, Chuck Britz, ostensibly under the group’s supervision.
“Brian may or may not have been present for those mixing sessions — evidence suggests that he trusted Chuck’s skills enough to let him prepare those mixes on his own — but the group held onto their multitrack tapes and delivered stereo masters to Capitol, rather than allowing Capitol to prepare their own stereo versions. Later, when Brian was only delivering mono masters, Capitol would prepare the Duophonic pseudo stereo editions for the stereo market,” says Alan Boyd, producer and Beach Boys’ archivist.
Surfer Girl was the third album by The Beach Boys and was originally produced by Brian Wilson on his own. The album featured numerous hits, including the title track, "Catch A Wave," "In My Room," "Hawaii," "Our Car Club," "Little Deuce Coupe," "Your Summer Dream," and more.
  • 0
The Beach Boys - Smiley Smile (1967/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: The Beach Boys
Title: Smiley Smile
Genre: Pop Rock, Rock & Roll, AM Pop, Sunshine Pop, Baroque Pop
Label: © Capitol Records
Release Date: 1965/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 27:51
Recorded: February 17, 1966–July 14, 1967б Sunset Sound Recorders, United Western Recorders, CBS Columbia Square, Brian Wilson's home studio, and Wally Heider Studios, Los Angeles



Smiley Smile is the 12th studio album released by the Beach Boys. The 1967 album features singles "Gettin' Hungry", "Heroes and Villains" and #1 US Billboard Hot 100 single "Good Vibrations". The record was a simplified version of their original project SMiLE, which never came to be after Brian Wilson discarded a large portion of the music intended for the album.
  • 0
The Beach Boys - Live In London (1970/2015) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: The Beach Boys
Title: Live In London
Genre: Pop Rock, Rock & Roll, AM Pop, Sunshine Pop, Baroque Pop
Label: © Capitol Records
Release Date: 1970/2015
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: HDTracks
Duration: 34:08
Recorded: December 8, 1968, Finsbury Park Astoria, London

Almost from the very moment the Beach Boys hit the top ten, fans across the country couldn’t wait to hear if the group could duplicate those terrific harmonies in person. It’s on this album…which features concerts from two disparate times in their career…that you’ll hear that the Beach Boys were not just terrific studio singers. Onstage, they could also create sounds that would make you feel like you were on the beach in California, that “Surf City” fantasy being one of the true primal attractions of the group’s music from the very beginning.
In December 1961, after “Surfin’” had hit the local airwaves, the Beach Boys played brief sets at a few hops and shows, notably their first paid gig on New Year’s Eve at the Long Beach Municipal Auditorium. Mike Love recalls that night. “We got three hundred dollars to play [three songs at] a Richie Valens memorial dance. I can still remember it because we got paid for something besides working, which was really a trip. We got paid for playing music.”
1962 was the year the Beach Boys cut their teeth as rock ‘n’ rollers with regular performances at local L.A. teen clubs like the Rainbow Gardens. They were often hired by concert promoter, disc-jockey and game show host Bob Eubanks to play several half-hour sets a night at his Cinnamon Cinder club. These dates weren’t very lucrative, according to Eubanks. “I used to pay them about a hundred dollars a night, twenty dollars a man. We always did capacity when the Beach Boys played.” Capacity, however, meant about four hundred people.
For many of their early dates in Southern California (what manager Murry Wilson called “the forty freebies”), the Beach Boys didn’t get paid at all; their reward came when the local DJs, who hosted the record hops, would play the group’s records on the radio, thereby increasing sales. Other promotional gigs might find the Beach Boys performing a few songs at a local record store, to increase customer traffic and encourage the retailer to stock larger quantities of their records. Everything was designed to increase airplay, back then the only way to have hit records.
  • 0
Dear visitor, you have not login. We recommend you to REGISTER and LOGIN to gain access to the full resource on our website.