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Miles Davis - Volume 3 (1954/2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: Miles Davis
Title: Volume 3
Genre: Jazz, Bop, Hard Bop, Trumpet Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records
Release Date: 1964 (10" BLP 5040)/2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC 2.0 Mono 192kHz/24bit
Source: acousticsounds.com
Duration: 26:22
Recorded at the Van Gelder's Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey, on March 6, 1954.

Miles Davis, Volume 3 (BLP 5040) is a 1954 10 inch LP album by Miles Davis. It consists of the third and last of three sessions recorded for Blue Note Records. Several years later, Davis would once again record at Blue Note, but as a sideman on Cannonball Adderley's Somethin' Else (BLP 1595).
The six tracks were recorded at Rudy Van Gelder's Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey, on March 6, 1954 For the session he used exactly the same quartet he would again record with seven days later for side 2 of the Miles Davis Quartet LP (PRLP 161), released by Prestige. Davis says in his autobiography that these were his first recording sessions after successfully quitting his heroin habit, and that he arranged them both quickly as he needed money fast, and both Blue Note's Alfred Lion and Prestige's Bob Weinstock had given him a fair chance earlier when his reputation was in decline. This was also the first of several sessions Davis would record with the young Horace Silver, whom he liked for his funky style of playing.
After the 10" LP format was discontinued, the tracks would all reappear on the 12" album version of Miles Davis Volume 2 (BLP 1502), alongside tracks from Davis' first two Blue Note sessions. In the CD era all six tracks would be reassigned to the CD version of Miles Davis Volume 1.
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McCoy Tyner - The Real McCoy (1967/2012) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: McCoy Tyner
Title: The Real McCoy
Genre: Jazz, Post Bop, Hard Bop, Piano Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records
Release Date: 1967/2012 Remaster
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: hdtracks
Duration: 37:21
Recorded: April 21, 1967, Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs
High Resolution Mastering by Alan Yoshida and Robin Lynn at Blanche DuBois, April 2012

“In preparing these hi def remasters, we were very conscientious about maintaining the feel of the original releases while adding a previously unattainable transparency and depth. It now sounds like you've set up your chaise lounge right in the middle of Rudy Van Gelder's studio!” - Blue Note President, Don Was.
The Real McCoy is an engaging and energizing set that finds the extraordinary pianist in peak form. The album highlights his development as both a composer and a performer. For his first album on Blue Note Records, McCoy is joined by Elvin Jones, Ron Carter and Joe Henderson. The quartet performs riveting tunes including “Passion Dance” and “Four by Five.”

When someone uses the word “idyllic” to describe a scene, we think of Monet’s Water Lillies or another classic of impressionism – a work in summery shades that pretty much demands a daydream. But there are different kinds of idylls – as “Search For Peace,” one of five McCoy Tyner originals here, suggests. The tempo is slow, stately, deliberate. The harmony, outlined first by piano trills and broken chords, has purpose behind it: The title implies an ongoing and perhaps unattainable quest, not some easily abandoned momentary pursuit. The theme, when it arrives, enhances this sense – it’s at once solemn like a hymn, and contemplative, and also floatingly free. It puts forth an idealistic vision of what “peace” might feel like, and in the same breath holds the full awareness of possible (likely) futility. Crucially, it’s not the jingoistic sloganeering of a peace rally; it’s a meditation on the potentiality of peace, and what it means to pursue it.
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Marilyn Manson - Third Day Of A Seven Day Binge (2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/44.1kHz

Artist: Marilyn Manson
Title: Third Day Of A Seven Day Binge
Genre: Industrial rock, industrial metal, alternative metal, hard rock, glam rock, shock rock
Label: © Hell, etc. | Cooking Vinyl Ltd.
Release Date: 2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 44,1kHz/24bit
Source: qobuz
Duration: 04:26

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Lou Donaldson - The Time Is Right (1960/2011) High-Fidelity ISO SACD Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Lou Donaldson
Title: The Time Is Right
Genre: Jazz, Bop, Hard Bop, Soul Jazz, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1960/2011
Quality: ISO SACD Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: PS³SACD
Duration: 36:58
Recorded: October 31 (tracks 1, 2, 4-7) and November 28 (track 3), 1959 at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.
Mastered: cousTech Mastering, Camarillo, California by Kevin Gray & Steve Hoffman.

"A soul survivor in every sense of the term, this alto saxophonist is one of the few remaining jazz artists who made a major impact on the jazz community via an extensive run with producer Alfred Lion and the Blue Note label (Horace Silver being another Blue Note legend that comes to mind). From his first recordings for the label with Art Blakey's Jazz Messengers, it was clear that Lou Donaldson put melody and sound at a premium, coming up with an amalgam that combined the creamy smoothness of Johnny Hodges with the quicksilver bop inflections of Charlie Parker." – All About Jazz
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Lou Donaldson - Blues Walk (1958/2010) High-Fidelity ISO SACD Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Lou Donaldson
Title: Blues Walk
Genre: Jazz, Hard Bop, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1958/2010
Quality: ISO SACD Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: PS³SACD
Duration: 34:12
Recorded: July 28, 1958 at Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey.
Mastered: cousTech Mastering, Camarillo, California by Kevin Gray & Steve Hoffman.

Lou Donaldson's undisputed masterpiece, Blues Walk, marks the point where the altoist began to decisively modify his heavy Charlie Parker influence and add a smoky, bluesy flavor of his own. The material is still firmly in the bebop style, and the mellower moments aren't as sleepy as some of Donaldson's subsequent work, so the album sounds vital and distinctive even as it slows down and loosens things up. What elevates Blues Walk to classic status is its inviting warmth. Donaldson's sweetly singing horn is melodic throughout the six selections, making even his most advanced ideas sound utterly good-natured and accessible. The easy-swinging title cut is arguably Donaldson's signature tune even above his late-'60s soul-jazz hits, and his other two originals, "Play Ray" and "Callin' All Cats," are in largely the same vein.

Lou Donaldson's undisputed masterpiece, Blues Walk, marks the point where the altoist began to decisively modify his heavy Charlie Parker influence and add a smoky, bluesy flavor of his own. The material is still firmly in the bebop vein, and the mellower moments aren't as sleepy as some of Donaldson's subsequent work, so the album sounds vital and distinctive even as it slows down and loosens things up. That makes it the definitive release in Donaldson's early, pre-soul-jazz period, but what elevates Blues Walk to classic status is its inviting warmth. Donaldson's sweetly singing horn is ingratiating and melodic throughout the six selections, making even his most advanced ideas sound utterly good-natured and accessible. The easy-swinging title cut is a classic, arguably Donaldson's signature tune even above his late-'60s soul-jazz hits, and his other two originals -- "Play Ray" and "Callin' All Cats" -- are in largely the same vein. Elsewhere, Donaldson displays opposite extremes of his sound; the up-tempo bebop classic "Move" provokes his fieriest playing on the record, and his romantic version of "Autumn Nocturne" is simply lovely, a precursor to Lush Life. The addition of Ray Barretto on conga is a subtle masterstroke, adding just a bit more rhythmic heft to the relaxed swing. There are numerous likable records in Donaldson's extensive catalog, but Blues Walk is the best of them all. --Steve Huey
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Kenny Dorham - Una Mas (1963/2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: Kenny Dorham
Title: Una Mas
Genre: Jazz, Bop, Hard Bop, Bossa Nova, Trumpet Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records
Release Date: 1963(BLP 4127/BST 84127)/2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: qobuz
Duration: 00:31:27
Recorded: April 1, 1963 at Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Trumpeter Kenny Dorham's Una Mas was one of 1963's best records. With its melding of hard-bop, bossa nova, and the blues, Una Mas is a prime example of the memorable vamps that Blue Note favored at the time, finding ultimate success later that year with Lee Morgan's The Sidewinder.
Dorham was a prolific recording artist for almost a decade before Una Mas—both under his own name and as a sideman for some of jazz's most notable leaders. He wasn't the flashiest or most aggressive player, but he had impeccably good taste as a soloist, and his compositions have enjoyed consistent attention from musicians ever since.
With Una Mas, Dorham takes a few risks. Not every jazz musician that tries to infuse Latin rhythms is successful, and in retrospect, some efforts sound contrived. By contrast, Una Mas manages the fusion seamlessly, leaving a record notable for its insistent but not overpowering rhythm, and simple, powerful melodies.
Una Mas is also notable as the first recorded appearance of the great tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson. Fresh out of the Army, Henderson's debut is unusually self-assured. A disciple of Charlie Parker, his playing here doesn't betray any copycat licks; instead, he turns in a solid performance of beautifully constructed solos. In many respects his playing here is more adventurous than Dorham's, a hint of great things yet to come.
The catchy and suave title track is one of the most recognizable tunes in the Blue Note catalog, built on brilliant economy and using a simple two-note bounce with a tight, blue chorus. Herbie Hancock contributes a particularly sophisticated handling of the two-note theme by modifying the chords almost continuously, even as he remains tightly within the rhythmic framework. The lineup, rounded out by bassist Butch Warren and drummer Tony Williams (only 17 at the time) is as tight and swinging as they come. --Greg Simmons, All About Jazz
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Joseph Haydn - The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross - Alexei Lubimov (2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/88.2kHz

Сomposer: Joseph Haydn (1732 - 1809)
Artist: Alexei Lubimov
Title: Joseph Haydn - The Seven Last Words of Christ on the Cross
Genre: Classical
Label: © Zig-Zag Territoires | Outhere Music
Release Date: 2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 88,2kHz/24bit
Source: qobuz
Duration: 01:04:20
Recorded: from 17 to 20 June 2013 in Doopsgezinde Gemeente Church, Haarlem (Netherlands)

Although it is played on a period instrument, no one is arguing that this recording of Haydn's The Seven Last Words of Christ is historically authentic. The work, exceptionally in Haydn's output, exists in multiple versions, for orchestra, string quartet, chorus, and keyboard (either fortepiano or harpsichord). But surely Haydn did not have the instrument heard here, the rare tangent piano, in his head. This was, speaking roughly, a piano-harpsichord hybrid that never really found its footing in the late 18th century. As long as listeners are down with the idea of a fairly speculative recording, the effect of the tangent piano in this particular work is electrifying. Lubimov gets the best of both worlds: the intimacy of the keyboard version and the dynamic contrasts and timbral shadings of the orchestral original. The keyboard transcription is not by Haydn himself but was made in his own time, and he approved it. Lubimov works from this, tweaking it and adding contrasts that break up the seven consecutive slow movements and give them an extraordinarily expressive quality. Even when listeners know it's coming, the final Terremoto movement, depicting the earthquake following Christ's crucifixion, comes as a shock. Listeners will never hear the work quite the same way again after experiencing this recording, and even if Haydn didn't intend it this way, most may well end up wishing he had.
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Johnny Hodges - Blues A Plenty (1958/2011) High-Fidelity DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz

Artist: Johnny Hodges Septet featuring Ben Webster
Title: Blues A Plenty
Genre: Jazz, Big Band, Swing, Blues, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Verve Records | Analogue Productions
Release Date: 1958 (MG VS-68358)/2011
Quality: DSF Stereo DSD64/2.82MHz
Source: Acoustic Sounds
Duration: 42:30
Recorded: New York, USA on April 5, 1958.

Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound from the original master tapes to vinyl and PCM. The DSD was sourced from the PCM. George listened to all of the different A/D converters he had before he chose which to use, and he felt the George Massenburg GML 20 bit A/D produced the best and most synergistic sound for the project.
"I really think that the people who are willing to lay down their money for these reissues are going to get something really outstanding." — George Marino, Sterling Sound engineer, commenting on Analogue Productions' Verve 25-title reissue series.
One of the giants of the alto saxophone, Johnny Hodges was perhaps the most important soloist and sideman in Duke Ellington's orchestra from 1928 up to Hodges' death in 1970. The self-taught player made many solo forays during his long career - one of his '50s outfits included a young John Coltrane - but history remembers Hodges for his virtuosic sidemanship, particularly his sensitive rendering of ballads.
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John Dowland - Lute Songs - Damien Guillon, Eric Bellocq (2011) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/88.2kHz

Сomposer: John Dowland (1563 – 1626), Philip Rosseter (1568 – 1623), Robert Johnson (c. 1583 – c. 1634), Anonymous / English Traditional
Artist: Damien Guillon, Eric Bellocq
Title: John Dowland - Lute Songs
Genre: Classical
Label: © Zig-Zag Territoires | Outhere Music
Release Date: 2011
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 88,2kHz/24bit
Source: qobuz
Duration: 01:00:17
Recorded: du 3 au 7 mai 2009 à l’Eglise Evangélique Allemande PARIS 11

Damien Guillon has chosen for his first solo recital disc a refined, subtle and melancholy repertoire, which he has gone on to explore in depth and polish in genuine chamber style with the lutenist Eric Bellocq, an expert in Renaissance music.

“Dowland is heir to the English polyphonic tradition (middle age conception) where words and music coincide not on meaning but through proportions generated by the planets, however he also explores the new modes of expression which were emerging on the continent related to italian renaissance which linked meaning of the words and musical effect, favoring harmony towards polyphony.

His ambivalent attitude seems to have caught the attention of the performers on this recording. Damien Guillon and Éric Bellocq succeed in finding an unprecedented balance between these two facets of the composer’s art. Both singer and lutenist dramatise their discourse by means of great variety of dynamics, yet without breaking up the polyphonic lines.” Jean-Luc Tamby
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Jackie McLean - Destination... Out! (1964/2014) High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 24bit/192kHz

Artist: Jackie McLean
Title: Destination... Out!
Genre: Jazz, Hard Bop, Post-Bop, Free Jazz, Avant-Garde, Saxophone Jazz
Label: © Blue Note Records
Release Date: 1964 (BLP 4165/BST 84165)/2014
Quality: High-Fidelity FLAC Stereo 192kHz/24bit
Source: hdtracks
Duration: 35:02
Recorded on September 20, 1963 at the Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.

Together with its predecessor, One Step Beyond, this 1963 session is considered one of Jackie McLean's best, to a great extent due to the stellar quintet members joining him. Trombonist Grachan Moncur III and vibraphonist Bobby Hutcherson both played on One Step Beyond, their musical chemistry with McLean so strong he invited them back for this album. The quintet is rounded out by Larry Ridley on bass and drummer Roy Haynes. Moncur III also contributes three out of the four songs here while McLean wrote the fourth, Kahlil The Prophet.

Like Eric Dolphy before him, Jackie McLean sought to create a kind of vanguard "chamber jazz" that still had the blues feel and -- occasionally -- the groove of hard bop, though with rounded, moodier edges. Destination Out! was the album on which he found it. Still working with Grachan Moncur III and Bobby Hutcherson -- his direct spiritual connection to Dolphy -- McLean changed his rhythm section by employing drummer Roy Haynes and bassist Larry Ridley. This combination proved a perfect balance of the four elements. The program is four tunes, three of which were written by Moncur. If there was a perfect Blue Note session after John Coltrane's Blue Train, this was it. Opening with a ballad was a novel idea in 1966, but McLean uses Moncur's love and hate to reveal all the tonal possibilities within this group of musicians, and the textural interplay that exists in the heightened sense of form, time breaks, and rhythm changes. As begun on One Step Beyond, the notion of interval is key in this band, and an elemental part of Moncur's composition. The horn lines are spare, haunting, warm, and treated as textural elements by Hutcherson's vibes. On the tune "Esoteric," Hutcherson and Haynes throw complex rhythmic figures into the mix. Moncur's writing is angular, resembling Ornette's early-'60s melodic notions more than Coltrane's modal considerations. Hutcherson's solo amid the complex, knotty melodic frame is just sublime. "Khalil the Prophet" is McLean's only contribution compositionally to the album, but it's a fine one. Using a hard bop lyric and a shape-shifting sense of harmonic interplay between the three front-line players, McLean moves deeply into a blues groove without giving into mere 4/4 time structures. The architecture of his solo is wonderfully obtuse, playing an alternating series of eighths, 12ths, and even 16ths against Hutcherson's wide-open comping and arpeggio runs. The set ends with Moncur's "Riff Raff," a strolling blues that makes full use of counterpoint on the vibes. Moncur sets his solo against McLean's melodic engagement of Hutcherson, forcing both men into opposition positions that get resolved in a sultry, funky, shimmering blues groove. Of all of McLean's Blue Note dates, so many of which are classic jazz recordings, Destination Out! stands as the one that reveals the true soulfulness and complexity of his writing, arranging, and "singing" voice. --Thom Jurek
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